Plans & Reports

HCD issues educational plans and reports, in addition to those that are federally and state-mandated, to educate all Californians on housing policy topics and to promote a more affordable and equitable housing landscape throughout the state.

HCD’s comprehensive San Francisco Housing Policy and Practice Review is the first of its kind. It identifies, and seeks to remove, barriers to housing approvals and construction at all income levels. This Review includes findings and Required Actions for San Francisco (City) to take to reform its housing approvals ecosystem and facilitate housing production and is informed by extensive quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. Implementing this Review’s Required Actions, as mandated by San Francisco’s adopted housing element, will ensure that San Francisco’s housing approval policies and practices are consistent with state housing laws, follow best practices, and will enable the City to meet the housing needs of residents at all income levels.

HCD partnered with researchers from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) to conduct an in-depth, year-long analysis of San Francisco’s regulatory regime and entitlement practices. This UCB academic research builds upon prior studies of land use regulation in California led by Moira O’Neill and colleagues. This partnership with UCB ensures an impartial review of San Francisco’s housing approvals process and directly informed HCD’s final report and recommendations. 

Full San Francisco Housing Policy and Practice Review Deliverables:

This Review was conducted in accordance with the powers conferred under Government Code section 11180 et seq., which gives HCD the authority to investigate and prosecute actions concerning all matters relating to the business activities and subjects under the jurisdiction of HCD, violations of any law or rule or order of HCD, and such other matters as may be provided by law. This authority includes, but is not limited to, the powers to inspect papers, books, accounts, documents, writings and records, hear complaints, administer oaths, issue subpoenas, propound interrogatories, take sworn testimony in connection with the authorized investigation, designate persons to serve subpoenas, and do all other things authorized under Government Code section 11180 et seq. 

Assembly Bill 209 (Chapter 251, Statutes of 2022), Section 31 (AB 209) requires the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) to submit policy recommendation(s) to ensure that residential dwelling units can maintain the recommended maximum safe indoor air temperature. The policy recommendations are due to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2025.

The policy recommendation(s) will consider the state’s climate goals, the extreme heat plan, regional temperature differences, and various methods for reducing indoor air temperatures, including, but not limited to, technical feasibility, building and site electrical system limitations, cost barriers, electric utility capacity limitations, state and federal statutory requirements, and other relevant factors. AB 209 requires HCD to consult with specific state agency and non-governmental stakeholders to develop the policy recommendation(s).

Questions or comments regarding the AB 209 project can be submitted to HCD at AB209@hcd.ca.gov.

AB 209 Workgroup and Charter

As specified in AB 209, HCD shall convene a workgroup of stakeholders to support the development of the maximum safe indoor air temperature policy recommendation(s). The goal of the workgroup is to garner participation from stakeholders in the development of policy recommendation(s), and to collaborate on research relevant to the scope of AB 209. The AB 209 workgroup charter provides information on stakeholder objectives and expectations.

View the AB 209 Workgroup Charter (PDF).

AB 209 Frequently Asked Questions

View the AB 209 project Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) (PDF). The FAQs will be updated as needed. Please check back for more information!
 

The Statewide Housing Plan lays out a vision to ensure every Californian has a safe, stable, and affordable home.

The plan describes why we need to act now to address the state’s housing affordability crisis, what we know about California’s housing crisis, including how we got here and growing challenges, what the housing needs in California are, what our state and local governments are currently doing to address the problem, where we are going in the future, and how we will track our progress.

The State of California is leveraging our digital tools to produce a dynamic, “living” plan with interactive features that will be updated as new data and research become available to track our shared progress toward our housing goals.

On the Statewide Housing Plan Landing Page, you'll find:

  • Statewide Housing Plan
  • 10-Year Housing Data Strategy
  • HCD 2020-21 Annual Report
  • Data Dashboard
  • PDF version of the plan
  • Additional data resources

View the Statewide Housing plan

This plan is an update to the Statewide Housing Assessment 2025 (PDF).

HCD's 2021-22 Annual Report (PDF) reflects back on the fiscal year July 1, 2021-June 30, 2022, highlighting the accomplishments of HCD's dedicated, mission-driven team, and the progress and improvements that raised the bar to better serve California and communities throughout the state.

Homekey has played a pivotal role in the state’s response to COVID-19. People experiencing homelessness and those at risk of homelessness are disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of the Homekey program was to provide grant funding to eligible applicants and facilitate a partnership between the state and local governments to quickly acquire, rehabilitate or master lease a variety of housing types to assist one of the most vulnerable populations impacted by COVID-19. This report includes:

  • The amount of funds expended for the uses described in this section.
  • The location of any properties for which the funds are used.
  • The number of useable housing units produced, or planned to be produced, using the funds.
  • The number of individuals housed, or likely to be housed, using the funds.
  • The number of units, and the location of those units, for which operating subsidies have been, or are planned to be, capitalized using the funds.
  • An explanation of how funding decisions were made for acquisition, conversion, or rehabilitation projects, or for capitalized operating subsidies, including what metrics were considered in making those decisions.
  • Any lessons learned from the use of the funds

View Report: Homekey: A Journey Home (PDF)

California Green Building Standards Code (CALGreen) — the nation's first state-mandated green-building code — has been in effect since January 1, 2011. CALGreen was created to improve public health, safety, and general welfare through enhanced design and construction of buildings using concepts that reduce negative impacts and promote principles that have a positive environmental impact and encourage sustainable construction practices.

CALGreen was created to address the five divisions of building construction:

  • Planning and design.
  • Energy efficiency.
  • Water efficiency and conservation.
  • Material conservation and resource efficiency.
  • Environmental quality.

View the 2023 CALGreen Report (PDF) to the California Legislature.

Learn more about CALGreen.

Federal Reports Citizen Participation Requirements

The following outlines the Citizen Participation Requirements for HCD’s federal reports: Consolidated Plan, Annual Action Plan, Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report and Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Report. These Citizen Participation Requirements only apply to the federal reports listed above.

Citizen Participation Plan

Citizen Participation Plan — Amended 09/08/2020 (PDF)

Presentation Materials

California’s Plan to Affirmatively Further Fair Housing

Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice

This analysis serves as the foundation for HCD and the state’s fair housing planning work, to expand housing choice and access to opportunity for all Californians, with a focus on members of protected classes. The Final 2020 AI details impediments to fair housing choice and action steps to address those impediments over the next five years.

To effectively combat housing discrimination and affirmatively further fair housing, HCD has identified a multi-pronged approach that includes recommendations and action steps to address the 10 impediments to fair housing choice identified through the 2020 AI process. The recommendations and action steps will inform HCD’s efforts to affirmatively further fair housing; to promote inclusive communities, further housing choice, and address community disparities through HCD’s programs, policies, and operations. HCD’s AFFH efforts will also follow guidance from state fair housing law, including AB 686 (2018).

Consolidated Plans and Annual Action Plans

California’s Consolidated Plan (Con Plan) is a five-year plan that examines the housing and community development needs of Californians and their communities and lays out how federal funds will be used to address these needs and improve the quality of life for Californians.

The Con Plan enables the State of California to administer funds for the following federal housing programs:

The Con Plan is applicable to jurisdictions that do not receive funding directly from HUD ("non-entitlement jurisdictions") and are eligible to participate in the state administered programs.

Consolidated Plan 2020-2024

State of California 2020-2024 Federal Consolidated Plan (PDF)

State of California 2020-2024 Federal Consolidated Plan – First Amendment – Minor (PDF)

  • This amendment adds Tenant Based Rental Assistance/Rapid Rehousing (TBRA/RR) as a Goal Outcome Indicator (GOI) to the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan Goal to Increase Housing Affordability, and sets a GOI of 350 households assisted during the 5-year planning period.

Presentation Materials

Consolidated Plan 2015-2020 

Annual Action Plans and Amendments (2020-2024)

The Consolidated Plan is implemented by Annual Action Plans. These annual plans provide the resources, actions, and activities that will be prioritized in the upcoming year to meet the needs and goals identified in the Consolidated Plan.

2024-2025

Annual Action Plan 2024-2025 – This is the fourth and final annual update to the 2020-2024 State of California Consolidated Plan. The Annual Action Plan outlines the State of California’s current priorities and strategies to address affordable housing and community development goals.

State of California 2024-2025 Draft Annual Action Plan (PDF)

Presentation Materials

2023-2024

Annual Action Plan 2023-2024 – This is the third of four annual updates to the 2020-2024 State of California Consolidated Plan. The Annual Action Plan outlines the State of California’s current priorities and strategies to address affordable housing and community development goals.

State of California 2023-2024 Annual Action Plan (PDF)

State of California 2023-2024 Annual Action Plan — First Amendment - Minor (PDF)

  • This is the first amendment to the 2023-2024 Annual Action Plan which will now reflect the current U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-issued HOME value limits, effective July 1, 2023 for the HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME) program. The waiver limits were approved by HUD on July 30, 2023. Additionally, the Housing Trust Fund (HTF) subsidy limit methodology is being amended to equal California’s Tax Credit Allocation Committee’s 2023 Threshold Basis Limits, established by bedroom size, for each county.

State of California 2023-2024 Annual Action Plan — Second Amendment - Substantial (PDF)

  • This is the second substantial amendment to the 2023-2024 Annual Action Plan which will allow the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and National Housing Trust Fund (NHTF) programs to modify the methods of distribution and timelines for the specified fiscal years.

Presentation Materials

2022-2023

Annual Action Plan 2022-2023 – This is the second of four annual updates to the 2020-2024 State of California Consolidated Plan. The Annual Action Plan outlines the State of California’s current priorities and strategies to address affordable housing and community development goals.

State of California 2022-2023 Annual Action Plan (PDF)

Presentation Materials

2021-2022

Annual Action Plan 2021-2022 – This is the first of four annual updates to the 2020-2024 State of California Consolidated Plan. The Annual Action Plan outlines the State of California’s current priorities and strategies to address affordable housing and community development goals.

State of California 2021-2022 Annual Action Plan (PDF)

State of California 2021-2022 Annual Action Plan — First Amendment (PDF)

  • This is the first amendment to the 2021-2022 Annual Action Plan which makes the Method of Distribution (MOD) for Housing Trust Fund (HTF) consistent to the MOD in the 2020-2021 AAP Second Substantial amendment and includes other changes.

State of California 2021-2022 Annual Action Plan — Second Amendment (PDF)

  • This is the second amendment to the 2021-2022 AAP. This amendment allows the State the option to provide the preferences outlined in AP-90 of the AAP under the NHTF program. Furthermore, the method of distribution (AP-30) for the HOME program is being amended to allow a tribal set aside in the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA).

State of California HOME-ARP Allocation Plan

On April 18, 2023, HUD approved the State of California (State) Draft Home Investment Partnerships Program - American Rescue Plan (HOME-ARP) Allocation Plan (The Plan). The Plan includes a summary of the State’s consultation activities in developing the plan, a description of Qualified Populations (QPs) within the State, an assessment of unmet needs and service gaps for the QPs, and a summary of the planned uses of the State’s HOME-ARP funds for eligible activities.

State of California HOME-ARP Allocation Plan Minor Amendment

  • The 2021-2022 Annual Action Plan (AAP) is being amended to allow the State the option to allocate funds for the Supportive Services Activity through a competitive Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) in the HOME Investments Partnership Program – American Rescue Plan (HOME-ARP) Allocation Plan.

Presentation Materials

2020-2021

State of California 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan — Located in 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan (PDF)

State of California 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan — First Substantial Amendment (PDF)

State of California 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan — Second Substantial Amendment (PDF)

State of California 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan — Third Amendment (PDF)

Presentation Materials

Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Reports (CAPER)

Submitted annually to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) provides an assessment of California's accomplishments and progress toward Consolidated Plan goals.

2022-2023

State of CA 2022-2023 CAPER (PDF)

Presentation Materials

2021-2022

State of CA 2021-2022 CAPER (PDF)

2020-2021

State of CA 2020-21 CAPER (PDF)

Archived Documents

Through outreach, case studies, interviews, and various other methods, HCD contracted with the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California, Berkeley to prepare the Residential Impact Fee Study (PDF), which provides an overview and analysis of impact fees in California and suggests findings and recommendations related to fee transparency, fee structure, fee design process, and alternative funding options. This study was commissioned by HCD pursuant to AB 879 (Grayson, Chapter 374, Statutes of 2017) to examine the reasonableness of local impact fees charged to new housing developments. The Terner Center is solely responsible for the content of this report.

Pursuant to AB 602 (Grayson, Chapter 347, Statutes of 2021), HCD contracted with the Terner Center for Housing Innovation to develop Impact Fee Nexus Studies Templates and Residential Feasibility Calculation Templates (PDF). These templates can assist local agencies, planners, and consultants in developing impact fee nexus studies, and assist in determining how fees impact the feasibility of residential development.

HCD will also be releasing further tools with regard to impact fee nexus studies. These will be released as they are completed throughout 2024.

Background: Local governments levy development impact fees to help fund the expansion of public facilities and infrastructure needed to support new housing development. These revenues support the construction of critical facilities, such as parks, public safety facilities, other civic and community facilities, and transportation infrastructure. To determine a reasonable relationship or nexus by which fees can be charged to new development, local governments must undertake a “nexus study.” Nexus studies are meant to quantify the impact of new development on public facilities and determine the cost of this impact, establishing the maximum fee amount that can be charged on the construction of new homes. They also provide the supporting documentation and justification that is used to establish the legal authority for jurisdictions to charge these fees.